Chimeric Antigen Receptor Technology

CAR T Is Designed to Reprogram the Cells

Chimeric antigen receptors, or CARs, are recombinant receptor constructs composed of an extracellular single-chain variable fragment (scFv) derived from an antibody, joined to a hinge/spacer peptide and a transmembrane domain, which is further linked to the intracellular T cell signaling domains of the T cell receptor. CAR T cells combine the specificity of an antibody with the cytotoxic and memory functions of T cells.

The single-chain variable fragment (scFv) is expressed on the surface of a CAR T cell and confers antigen specificity. The scFv is derived from the portion of an antibody that specifically recognizes a target protein.
The spacer connects the extracellular targeting element to the transmembrane domain and affects CAR function and scFv flexibility.
The transmembrane domain traverses the cell membrane, anchors the CAR to the cell surface, and connects the extracellular domain to the intracellular signaling domain, thus impacting expression of the CAR on the cell surface.
The costimulatory domain is derived from the intracellular signaling domains of costimulatory proteins, such as CD28 and 4-1BB, that enhance cytokine production.
The CD3 zeta domain is derived from the intracellular signaling portion of the T cell receptor, which mediates downstream signaling during T cell activation.

An Evolving Field

Cellular therapy is an exciting and evolving area of science. Keep up with the latest information through our publications and website designed for healthcare professionals.