Developing Best-in-Class Therapies

Juno’s pipeline of investigational CAR T cell product candidates applies our CAR and TCR technologies against a variety of cancer targets.

NHL Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Target

CD19 is a protein expressed on the surface of almost all B-cell leukemias and lymphomas.

Trial Number
Trial Description
Trial Number
NCT02631044
Trial Description

Study Evaluating the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of JCAR017 in B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

Learn more at Clinicaltrials.gov ›
Enrollment Status: Recruiting

Please contact the trial center for more information on eligibility

Locations
Birmingham, AL
University of Alabama-Birmingham
Duarte, CA
City of Hope
Chicago, IL
Northwestern University
Contact:
Leo I Gordon, MD 312-695-4546
Boston, MA
Massachusetts General Hospital
Contact:
Jeremy Abramson, MD 617-724-4000
Boston, MA
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Omaha, NE
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact:
Susan Blumel, RN 402-559-9183
New York, NY
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Contact:
Lia Palomba, MD 212-639-5317
Houston, TX
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Contact:
Michael Wang, MD 713-792-2860
Seattle, WA
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Contact:
Kieu-Thu Bui, RN 206-667-1915
About Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is not a single disease, but rather a group of several closely related cancers with different patterns of treatment. Over 70,000 cases of NHL are diagnosed in the U.S. each year. NHL is typically divided into aggressive (fast-growing) and indolent (slow-growing) subtypes. Juno is planning to evaluate multiple product candidates in Phase 1 trials for common types of relapsed or refractory (R/R) B cell NHL of both aggressive and indolent subtypes. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

NHL Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Target

CD19 is a protein expressed on the surface of almost all B-cell leukemias and lymphomas.

Trial Number
Trial Description
Trial Number
NCT02706405
Trial Description

JCAR014 and Durvalumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Learn more at Clinicaltrials.gov ›
Enrollment Status: Recruiting

Please contact the trial center for more information on eligibility

Locations
Seattle, WA
Fred Hutch/University of Washington Cancer Consortium
Contact:
Immunotherapy Trials Intake, SCCA 206-288-1024
About Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is not a single disease, but rather a group of several closely related cancers with different patterns of treatment. Over 70,000 cases of NHL are diagnosed in the U.S. each year. NHL is typically divided into aggressive (fast-growing) and indolent (slow-growing) subtypes. Juno is planning to evaluate multiple product candidates in Phase 1 trials for common types of relapsed or refractory (R/R) B cell NHL of both aggressive and indolent subtypes. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

Pediatric ALL Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Target

CD22 is a protein expressed by most B-cell malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

Trial Number
Trial Description
Trial Number
NCT02315612
Trial Description

Anti-CD22 Chimeric Receptor T Cells in Pediatric and Young Adults With Recurrent or Refractory CD22-expressing B Cell Malignancies

Learn more at Clinicaltrials.gov ›
Enrollment Status: Recruiting

Please contact the trial center for more information on eligibility

Locations
Bethesda, MD
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, 9000 Rockville Pike
Contact:
For more information at the NIH Clinical Center contact National Cancer Institute Referral Office 888-624-1937
About Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is an uncontrolled proliferation of lymphoblasts, which are immature white blood cells. The lymphoblasts, which are produced in the bone marrow, cause damage and death by inhibiting the production of normal cells. Approximately 6,000 patients are diagnosed with ALL in the United States each year, and although just over half of the new diagnoses are in adult patients, the vast majority of the approximately 1,400 deaths per year occur in adults. There are two main types of ALL, B cell ALL and T cell ALL. Approximately 80% of cases of ALL are B cell ALL, which we aim to address with our CD19 product candidates. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

NHL Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Target

CD22 is a protein expressed by most B-cell malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

Trial Number
Trial Description
Trial Number
NCT02315612
Trial Description

Anti-CD22 Chimeric Receptor T Cells in Pediatric and Young Adults With Recurrent or Refractory CD22-expressing B Cell Malignancies

Learn more at Clinicaltrials.gov ›
Enrollment Status: Recruiting

Please contact the trial center for more information on eligibility

Locations
Bethesda, MD
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, 9000 Rockville Pike
Contact:
For more information at the NIH Clinical Center contact National Cancer Institute Referral Office 888-624-1937
About Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is not a single disease, but rather a group of several closely related cancers with different patterns of treatment. Over 70,000 cases of NHL are diagnosed in the U.S. each year. NHL is typically divided into aggressive (fast-growing) and indolent (slow-growing) subtypes. Juno is planning to evaluate multiple product candidates in Phase 1 trials for common types of relapsed or refractory (R/R) B cell NHL of both aggressive and indolent subtypes. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

Multiple Myeloma

Target

B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is expressed on all plasma cells, including cancerous plasma cells in multiple myeloma.

Trial Number
Trial Description
Trial Number
NCT03070327
Trial Description

BCMA Targeted CAR T Cells for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

Learn more at Clinicaltrials.gov ›
Enrollment Status: Recruiting

Please contact the trial center for more information on eligibility

Locations
New York, NY
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Contact:
Sham Mailankody, MD 212-639-2131
About Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a form of blood cancer that occurs when white blood cells known as plasma cells, which are typically found in the bone marrow, grow out of control and develop into tumors. Approximately 30,000 new cases of multiple myeloma will be diagnosed this year in the U.S. There are few known risk factors for developing this disease and it may not cause signs or symptoms that would lead to a diagnosis until it has advanced to the kidneys and other organs. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

AML Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Target

WT1 is an intracellular protein that is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including acute myeloid leukemia and non-small cell lung, breast, pancreatic, ovarian, and colorectal cancers.

Trial Number
Trial Description
Trial Number
NCT01640301
Trial Description

Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Learn more at Clinicaltrials.gov ›
Enrollment Status: Suspended
Locations
Seattle, WA
Fred Hutch/University of Washington Cancer Consortium
About Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Every year about 13,000 people are diagnosed with AML in the United States, with the incidence increasing in the advanced age group. AML is often incurable with standard systemic therapy. Despite the many advances in the field of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), relapse after transplantation continues to be a major problem, particularly in patients entering HCT with high risk/poor prognosis diseases. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

NSCLC, Mesothelioma Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Mesothelioma

Target

WT1 is an intracellular protein that is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including acute myeloid leukemia and non-small cell lung, breast, pancreatic, ovarian, and colorectal cancers.

Trial Number
Trial Description
Trial Number
NCT02408016
Trial Description

Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

Learn more at Clinicaltrials.gov ›
Enrollment Status: Recruiting

Please contact the trial center for more information on eligibility

Locations
Seattle, WA
Fred Hutch/University of Washington Cancer Consortium
Contact:
Sylvia M. Lee 206-288-2274
About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for up to 85% of all lung cancer diagnoses in the U.S. Within NSCLC, there are many subtypes of the disease depending on the different types of lung cells. Immunotherapy for NSCLC is a newer type of treatment that boosts a person’s immune system to help fight their cancer. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

About Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive type of cancer that grows in the lining of the lungs or abdomen, or in the lining around the heart cavity. It most typically is found in the lungs. The most common risk factor for mesothelioma is exposure to asbestos. Often, the disease is not diagnosed until it has advanced and affected many organs. At this time there is no cure for mesothelioma. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

Pediatric Neuroblastoma

Target

L1CAM, also known as CD171, is a cell-surface adhesion molecule that is overexpressed in neuroblastoma, and there is increasing evidence of aberrant expression in a variety of solid organ tumors, including glioblastoma, lung, pancreatic, and ovarian cancers.

Trial Number
Trial Description
Trial Number
NCT02311621
Trial Description

Engineered Neuroblastoma Cellular Immunotherapy (ENCIT)-01

Learn more at Clinicaltrials.gov ›
Enrollment Status: Recruiting

Please contact the trial center for more information on eligibility

Locations
Seattle, WA
Seattle Children's Hospital
Contact:
Julie Park 206-987-2106
About Neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma is a type of cancer that starts in the early nerve cells, known as neuroblasts, of infants and young children under the age of 10. It accounts for approximately 6 percent of all cancers in children, with about 700 new cases in the U.S. each year. In infants, it is the most common solid cancer. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

Ovarian Ovarian Cancer

Target

MUC16 is a protein overexpressed in the majority of ovarian cancers. Blood levels of CA-125, a protein from the cleavage of MUC16, can be correlated with ovarian cancer progression.

Trial Number
Trial Description
Trial Number
NCT02498912
Trial Description

Cyclophosphamide Followed by Intravenous and Intraperitoneal Infusion of Autologous T Cells Genetically Engineered to Secrete IL-12 and to Target the MUC16ecto Antigen in Patients With Recurrent MUC16ecto+ Solid Tumors

Learn more at Clinicaltrials.gov ›
Enrollment Status: Recruiting

Please contact the trial center for more information on eligibility

Locations
New York, NY
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Contact:
Roisin O'Cearbhaill, MD 646-888-4227
About Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer mainly affects women over the age of 63, with more than 22,000 diagnoses in the U.S. this year. While all women are at risk of developing ovarian cancer, those with the BRCA2 gene mutation are at increased risk for developing this type of cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer and the stage of the disease. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

NSCLC, Breast Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Target

ROR1 is a protein overexpressed on a wide variety of cancers including a subset of non-small cell lung cancer, triple-negative breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and prostate cancer. It is highly expressed on B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma.

Trial Number
Trial Description
Trial Number
NCT02706392
Trial Description

Genetically Modified T-Cell Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced ROR1+ Malignancies

Learn more at Clinicaltrials.gov ›
Enrollment Status: Recruiting

Please contact the trial center for more information on eligibility

Locations
Seattle, WA
Fred Hutch/University of Washington Cancer Consortium
About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for up to 85% of all lung cancer diagnoses in the U.S. Within NSCLC, there are many subtypes of the disease depending on the different types of lung cells. Immunotherapy for NSCLC is a newer type of treatment that boosts a person’s immune system to help fight their cancer. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

About Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in American women, with more than 250,000 new cases diagnosed this year. In triple-negative breast cancer, the breast cancer cells test negative for the hormones estrogen (ER-) and progesterone (PR-) and the protein HER2 (HER2-). As a result, this type of cancer does not respond to hormonal therapy or therapies that target HER2. Approximately 10-20% of breast cancers fall into this category and are more common in young women and those who are African-American or Hispanic/Latina. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

Lung Cancer

Target

The Lewis Y (LeY) blood group antigen is highly expressed in a number of solid tumors, including lung, colorectal, gastric, breast, and ovarian cancers.

Trial Number
Trial Description
About Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women (after skin cancer) and is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage. Most lung cancer diagnoses are related to smoking or exposure to environmental factors but some occur in people with no known risk factors. Recommended treatments vary depending on the type of lung cancer and the stage of the disease. (Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)

Learn More

Explore CAR T science more in-depth, learn about our therapeutic areas, and explore additional resources at the links below.