Juno brings together some of the world’s leaders in oncology, immunology, and cell therapy who are pioneers in the CAR and TCR space.

Renier Brentjens, M.D., Ph.D.

Scientific Founder

Bio

Renier Brentjens obtained an M.D. and Ph.D. in Microbiology from SUNY Buffalo, completed residency in medicine at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and a medical oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSK). Currently, Dr. Brentjens is an associate member on the faculty at MSK and an attending physician on the Leukemia Service. As a medical oncology fellow at MSK, Dr. Brentjens initiated the initial pre-clinical studies demonstrating the potential clinical application of autologous T cells genetically modified to target the CD19 antigen using CARs. Following completion of his medical oncology training, Dr. Brentjens became the principal investigator of his own laboratory. As a principal investigator, Dr. Brentjens successfully translated these studies to the clinical setting, treating patients with relapsed CD19+ tumors including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Ongoing pre-clinical research in the laboratory is focused on the further development of CAR modified T cells designed to overcome the hostile immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment through the generation of “armored CAR T cells” currently being translated to the clinical setting as second generation CAR modified T cell clinical trials. Additionally, work in the Brentjens’ lab has expanded this CAR technology to target additional tumor antigens.

Phil Greenberg, M.D.

Scientific Founder

Bio

Philip Greenberg graduated from Washington University with a degree in biology. He received his M.D. summa cum laude from the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center. After postdoctoral training in immunology at the University of California, San Diego, he completed his clinical training in medical oncology and joined the faculty of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the Division of Oncology at the University of Washington. He is currently the Head of the Program in Immunology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and has a joint appointment at the University of Washington as Professor in the Oncology Division of the Department of Medicine and as Professor in the Department of Immunology. Dr. Greenberg’s research has always maintained a focus on both basic immunology and cancer immunobiology as a means to develop translational approaches to treat human malignancies and chronic infections, particularly employing adoptive T cell therapy as a strategy to treat patients with antigen-specific T cells that can selectively target their disease. He has received international recognition as a leader in the field of cancer immunology, as reflected by election to several honorary societies, including the American Society of Clinical Investigation, the American Association of Physicians, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American College of Physicians. He has also been the recipient of two NIH MERIT awards. In 2010 he, along with past and present members of his research group, received the International Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) Team Science Award for Career Achievements (2010), and in 2011 he shared, with Steve Rosenberg from the NCI, the Cancer Research Institute’s William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology for their independent studies to develop and translate adoptive T cell therapy of cancer.

Michael Jensen, M.D.

Scientific Founder

Bio

Michael Jensen graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine then completed training in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology at the University of Washington/Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Dr. Jensen trained in the laboratory of Philip Greenberg and received AACR’s 1996 Fellowship in Clinical/Translational Research. Following completion of his fellowship, Dr. Jensen joined the faculty at the Beckman Research Institute at City of Hope where he served for thirteen years and progressed from an Assistant Professor to a full Professor. There, Dr. Jensen built a translational research program integrating synthetic antigen receptor design and T cell gene transfer as a strategy to implement immunotherapy for cancer. Dr. Jensen initiated the first CAR T cell trials using CD20 and CD19 specific CARs, as well as first in human trials for children with neuroblastoma and malignant gliomas. Based on this productivity, the Beckman Research Institute created the Department of Cancer Immunotherapeutics & Tumor Immunology and incorporated into the institution’s NCI-Comprehensive Cancer Center the Cancer Immunotherapeutics Program with Dr. Jensen as its leader. During his tenure at City of Hope, Dr. Jensen’s research program placed a strong emphasis on bench-to-bedside translational research and resulted in five FDA-authorized Investigational New Drug Applications covering first-in-human applications of adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T-cells having re-directed tumor specificity for lymphoma, neuroblastoma, and malignant gliomas. Dr. Jensen joined the University of Washington School of Medicine faculty in 2010 as the Sinegal Endowed Professor of Pediatrics. He is a Joint Member of the FHCRC’s Division of Clinical Research and is an Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at the UWSOM. His laboratory research program is located at the Seattle Children’s Research Institute, and he is the founding director of the Ben Towne Center for Childhood Cancer Research. He has founded SCRI’s new Program in Cell and Gene Therapy and directs the institute’s Therapeutic Cell Production Core.

Stan Riddell, M.D.

Scientific Founder

Bio

Stan Riddell is a member of the Clinical Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) and Professor of Oncology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Riddell is a leader in developing therapies that harness the immune system to fight cancer and infectious diseases. His research led to patented technologies that rapidly expand the number of disease fighting T cells used in adoptive immunotherapy. He also isolated a rare subset of disease-fighting T cells that survive in patients for an extraordinary amount of time. In 2010, Dr. Riddell received the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer’s first Team Science Award for major contributions to research and the clinical translation of cancer immunotherapy. Dr. Riddell received his M.D. from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg. He joined FHCRC Faculty in 1991 after training in medical oncology and immunology. Dr. Riddell was recently elected to the Association of American Physicians, an organization honoring those who have achieved excellence in biomedical science.

Isabelle Rivière, Ph.D.

Scientific Founder

Bio

Isabelle Rivière received her Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Biology from the University of Paris.  She initiated her graduate studies in the Interferon Research Group at the Institut Curie, Paris and completed her thesis work in the laboratory of Richard Mulligan, Ph.D. at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA.  During this time, she developed the MFG/SFG-based gamma-retroviral vectors for in vivo long-term expression of transgenes in hematopoietic cells, which are currently used in multiple clinical trials for the treatment of hereditary blood disorders and cancer. She subsequently worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dan Littman, MD, Ph.D. at New York University, New York, NY. Her studies focused on the regulation of cytokines produce by T helper lymphocytes in vivo, based on a mouse model she developed to track IL-4 secreting T cells using homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Dr. Rivière joined the faculty of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) in 1999.  She is currently the Director of the Cell Therapy and Cell Engineering Facility where she investigates novel strategies for cell therapies and immunotherapies to increase or retarget the immune response against tumors and treat hematological disorders. Her laboratory has developed multiple processes for clinical-grade gamma-retroviral and lentiviral vector production as well as hematopoietic and T cell manufacturing. Dr. Rivière serves on the editorial board of Molecular Therapy: Methods and Clinical Development and on multiple committees of the Association of Academic Biologics Manufacturers (AABM), the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) and the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy (ASGCT).

Michel Sadelain, M.D., Ph.D.

Scientific Founder

Bio

Michel Sadelain is Head of the Gene Transfer and Gene Expression Laboratory at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSK). Dr. Sadelain’s research focuses on novel approaches to enhance T cell costimulation and function. His clinical program focuses on B cell malignancies as well as solid tumors. Dr. Sadelain is the incumbent of the Stephen and Barbara Friedman Chair and the founding director of the Center for Cell Engineering at MSK. He previously served on the Board of Directors of the American Society of Gene Therapy (2004-2007) and continues to serve on the editorial boards of Molecular Therapy, Human Gene Therapy and Gene Therapy.